Contents Calendar Find Reference
Translation 
Navigating the Bible
Leviticus Chapter 3
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Subjects
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
Numbers
Deuteronomy

Peace Offerings of Cattle
3:1 If one's sacrifice is a peace offering and it is from the cattle, he may offer either an unblemished male or an unblemished female before God.
3:2 He shall press his hands on the head of the sacrifice, and have it slaughtered at the entrance of the Communion Tent. The priests who are Aaron's descendants shall dash its blood on all sides of the altar.
3:3 The portion of the peace offerings that must be presented as a fire offering to God must include the layer of fat covering the stomachs and all the other fat attached to the stomachs.
3:4 The two kidneys along with the fat on them along the flanks, and the lobe over the liver near the kidneys must [also] be removed.
3:5 Aaron's descendants shall burn this on the altar, along with the burnt offering which is on the wood on the fire. It is a fire offering, an appeasing fragrance to God.

Peace Offerings of Sheep
3:6 If one's sacrifice for a peace offering to God is taken from the smaller animals, he may [also] present an unblemished male or female animal.
3:7 If he brings a sheep as his sacrifice, he shall present it before God.
3:8 He shall press his hands on the head of the sacrifice and have it slaughtered in front of the Communion Tent. Aaron's descendants shall then dash its blood on all sides of the altar.
3:9 He shall present the choicest parts of his peace offering as a fire offering to God, removing the broad tail up to the backbone, along with the layer of fat covering the stomachs and all the other fat attached to the stomachs.
3:10 The two kidneys along with the fat on them along the flanks, and the lobe over the liver near the kidneys, must [also] be removed.
3:11 The priest shall burn them on the altar, to be consumed as a fire offering to God.

Peace Offerings of Goats
3:12 If his sacrifice is a goat, he shall present it before God.
3:13 He shall press his hands on its head, and have it slaughtered before the Communion Tent. Aaron's descendants shall then dash its blood on all sides of the altar.
3:14 As his fire offering sacrifice to God, he shall present the layer of fat that covers the stomachs, and all the other fat attached to the stomachs.
3:15 The two kidneys along with the fat on them along the flanks, and the lobe over the liver near the kidneys, shall also be removed.
3:16 The priests shall burn them on the altar, to be consumed as a fire offering, an appeasing fragrance.

All the prescribed internal fat thus belongs to God.

3:17 It shall be an eternal law, for all your generations, that you are not to eat any internal fat [that is normally sacrificed] nor any blood, no matter where you may live.



Commentary:

peace offering
  Shelamim in Hebrew, shelem in the singular (Amos 5:22). See Exodus 24:5. From the word shalom, meaning peace. Or, 'fellowship offering' (Sifra; Radak, Sherashim; HaKethav VeHaKabbalah), 'repayment offering' (Rashbam; HaKethav VeHaKabbalah), or 'perfection offering' (Ibn Janach). Some say that it is the 'offering of a whole person' since it is not brought for sin (Ramban; Lekach Tov; Midrash HaGadol; HaKethav VeHaKabbalah).

layer of fat...
  This is particularly the layer of fat that covers the animal's two stomachs, the omasum (hemses) and the reticulum (beth ha-kosoth) (Chullin 93a; Yad, Maakhaloth Assuroth 7:6; Yoreh Deah 64:8). Some also include the fat on the paunch or rumen (keres) (Tosefta, Chullin 9:3; Hagahoth Maimonioth, Maachaloth Assuroth 7:6; Yoreh Deah 64:9). This is often identified as the viscal peritoneum.

Specifically not included, however, is the fat attached to the abdominal cavity (Sifra). Also not included is the fat on the intestines (Yad, Maachaloth Assuroth 7:9; see next note 'all the other fat...'. See note on Leviticus 3:17.

all the other fat...
  This, specifically, is the fat on the maw (keva) (Chullin 49b; Yad, Maakhaloth Assuroth 7:6; Yoreh Deah 64:14). This is usually identified with the grain-like protrusions of peritoneal fat now designated as appendices epiploicae (chitte de-karkashta; Chullin 49b). Some authorities also include the fat on the intestines (Rabbi Akiba, Chullin 49b). The fat on the spleen is also included (Chullin 93a; Yoreh Deah 64:10). This includes fat that is actually attached to these organs (Ralbag).

the fat on them
  This is primarily the fatty capsule covering the kidneys ( Chullin 93a; Yoreh Deah 64:12).

along the flanks
  (Rashi; Radak, Sherashim). Kesalim in Hebrew. This is the fat in the body cavity over the hind legs ( Chullin 93a; Yad, Maakhaloth Assuroth 7:6,7). Some translate kesalim as inner organs (Saadia; cf. Ibn Janach).

lobe
  (Rambam, Introduction to Zevachim; Abarbanel; Sefer HaIttur 2, Assereth HaDibroth 44, p. 3b; Septuagint; cf. Ralbag; Tamid 4:2). Yothereth in Hebrew. See Exodus 29:13. This is usually identified as the caudate lobe of the liver, which in ruminants, rests on the right kidney (see next note, 'near the kidneys').

Others, however, translate yothereth as the diaphragm (Rashi; Radak, Sherashim; HaKethav VeHaKabbalah on Exodus 29:19). This is derived from the Targum, which renders yothereth as chatzra. However, there are others who identify the chatzra with the lobe of the liver (Hai Gaon, quoted in Arukh HaShalem; cf. Beth Yosef, Yoreh Deah, 41, s.v. Kathav Behag).

near the kidneys
  Or 'on the kidneys'. However, according to those who translate yothereth as diaphragm, they render the verse, 'the diaphragm over the liver, along with the kidneys' (Rashi; Ibn Ezra).

along with
  (Rashi). Literally 'on'. See Exodus 29:25.

choicest parts
  (Rashi; Targum Yonathan; Yad, Maakhaloth 7:5; cf. Ramban). See Genesis 4:4. Or, 'the fat broad tail' (Ibn Ezra), or 'the fat and broad tail' (Saadia). See Exodus 29:22.

backbone
  Atzeh or etzah in Hebrew. The bone over the kidney (Chullin 11a; Rashi; Saadia; Ibn Janach; Radak, Sherashim; Yad, Maaseh HaKorbanoth 1:8; Yoreh Deah 64:13 in Hagah). This is usually identified as the os cruris or the os caudae coccygisve.

to be consumed
  Literally 'bread,' lechem in Hebrew. Some say that this denotes something acceptable before God (Saadia). According to others it denotes 'food' (Ibn Ezra), 'flesh' (Ibn Janach; Radak), or 'fuel for the fire' (Rashi; Hirsch). It might be called a 'bread offering' because part of it was eaten; but see Numbers 28:2. It may also denote 'spiritual food.'

normally sacrificed
  (cf. Chullin 93a; Yad, Maakhaloth Assuroth 7:5).





Copyright © 2000 World ORT
Notice: This computer program is protected by copyright law and international treaties. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of this program, or any portion of it, may result in severe civil and criminal penalties, and will be prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.