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Leviticus Kedoshim
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
  VaYikra
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Numbers
Deuteronomy
HaShem instructs the Kohanim to exercise extreme care when they enter the Mishkan. On Yom Kippur, the Kohen Gadol is to approach the holiest part of the Mishkan after special preparations and in special clothing. He brings offerings that are unique for Yom Kippur including the two identical goats that are designated by lottery. One is 'for HaShem,' and is offered in the Temple, while the other is 'for Azazel' in the desert.

The Torah states the individual's obligations on Yom Kippur: On the 10th day of the seventh month, one must abstain from eating and drinking, anointing, wearing leather footwear, washing and marital relations. Consumption of blood is prohibited. The blood of slaughtered birds and undomesticated beasts must be covered. The people are warned against engaging in the wicked practices that were common in Egypt. Incest is defined and prohibited. Marital relations are forbidden during a woman's monthly cycle. Homosexuality, bestiality and child sacrifice are prohibited. The nation is enjoined to be holy. Many prohibitions and positive commandments are taught: Prohibitions: idolatry; eating offerings after their time-limit; theft and robbery; denial of theft; false oaths; retention of someone's property; delaying payment to an employee; hating or cursing a fellow Jew (especially one's parents); gossip; placing physical and spiritual stumbling blocks; perversion of justice; inaction when others are in danger; embarrassing; revenge; bearing a grudge; cross-breeding; wearing a garment of wool and linen; harvesting a tree during its first three years; gluttony and intoxication; witchcraft; shaving the beard and sideburns; and tattooing.

Positive: awe for parents and respect for the elderly; leaving part of the harvest for the poor; loving others (especially a convert); eating fruits from a tree's 4th year in Jerusalem; awe for the Temple; respect for Rabbis, the blind and the deaf. Family life must be holy. We are warned again not to imitate gentile behaviour, lest we lose the Land of Israel. We must observe kashrut and thereby maintain our unique and separate status.




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